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Super Bowls: serving bowl size and food consumption.

JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 29.98). 05/2005; 293(14):1727-8. DOI: 10.1001/jama.293.14.1727
Source: PubMed
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    Oksana Mont, Matthias Lehner, Eva Heiskanen
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted as part of a government commission which was given to the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (Swedish EPA) in 2014. The Environmental Protection Agency mandated the International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics (IIIEE) at Lund University to conduct a research study on nudging. The study has served and will serve as a direct input to further strategic work on sustainable consumption policies. The aim of the report is to synthesize existing knowledge about the effects achievable with nudging on consumption and the environment, in what areas nudging according to research can have the best effect and how nudging should be applied to give the best effect. The study comprised a literature review and interviews to collect experiences of working with nudging available in some countries.
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    ABSTRACT: People often purchase food products on impulse and their visual impression of such products plays an important role in impulse buying. Consumers are also likely to buy food items based on the images as displayed on mobile devices like smartphones. Food-service and dining industries have therefore begun to pay closer attention to improving the visual impression of the foods they offer. This study focused on determining whether participants’ visual attention directed toward food-item images can vary depending on the background saliency. Differences in patterns of visual attention with respect to food-item images between North American and Chinese participants were also compared. During the time participants were looking at pictures of food items with varying backgrounds in the absence of a particular task, their eye movements were traced with an eye-tracker. As background contexts such as table setting and decoration became more salient, participants’ visual attention toward the food items decreased. Chines participants also looked at food items significantly later than American counterparts, implying that Chinese participants were relatively more influenced by background contexts. In conclusion, our findings provide empirical evidence that background context and culture can affect participants’ visual attention while they are freely looking at pictures of food items.
    Food Quality and Preference 04/2015; 41. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    Oksana Mont, Matthias Lehner, Eva Heiskanen

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