Article

The epidemiology of migraine

Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461, USA.
The American Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 5.3). 04/2005; 118 Suppl 1:3S-10S. DOI: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2005.01.014
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This article provides a review of the epidemiology and risk factors for migraine in population studies, as well as patterns for healthcare use. The burden and costs of migraine, as well as risk factors for disease progression, are also discussed. Although migraine is a remarkably common cause of temporary disability, many persons with migraine, even those with disabling headache, have never consulted a physician for the problem. Prevalence is highest in women, in persons between the ages of 25 and 55 years, and, at least in the United States, in individuals from lower income households. However, prevalence is high in groups other than these high-risk groups. In a subgroup of patients, migraine may be a progressive disorder.

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