Article

Mondor's disease of the breast: Is there any relation to breast cancer?

Breast Unit--2nd Department of Propedeutic Surgery, Athens University Medical School, Laiko General Hospital, Athens, Greece.
European journal of gynaecological oncology (Impact Factor: 0.6). 02/2005; 26(2):213-4.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Ten cases of Mondor's disease of the breast (9 females, 1 male) are described. The diagnosis was based mainly on clinical examination, while breast imaging, used in five cases, was complementary. Most of our cases (9) had complete restoration of the thrombosed subcutaneous breast vein, either spontaneously (4), or after anti-inflammatory medication (5). Only one of our patients had surgical management (vein excision) due to delayed remission. None of our cases was related to breast cancer.

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    ABSTRACT: Mondor's disease is spontaneously remitting benign superficial thrombophlebitis involving healthy veins. Fewer than 400 cases have been reported in the world literature. Typically, subcutaneous angiitis is observed on the upper anterolateral aspect of the chest wall.We report three cases in which Mondor's disease occurred after surgery for breast cancer in one patient, and had no apparent cause in two other patients. The relationship with breast cancer and risk factors suggests that routine mammography is advisable. For patients presenting idiopathic Mondor's disease, follow-up is of utmost importance.
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