Article

Psychiatric comorbidity in gender identity disorder.

Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Culmannstrasse 8, Zurich CH-8091, Switzerland.
Journal of Psychosomatic Research (Impact Factor: 2.84). 04/2005; 58(3):259-61. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2004.08.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Despite being recognized as an important prognostic factor for the outcome in gender identity disorder (GID), psychiatric comorbidity has rarely been assessed by means of standardized diagnostic instruments. The aim of this study was to assess current and lifetime psychiatric comorbidity in patients with GID.
A cross-sectional sample of 31 patients who were treated for GID was assessed by the structured clinical interview for Axis I and II (SCID-I/II) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).
Twenty-nine percent of the patients had no current or lifetime Axis I disorder; 39% fulfilled the criteria for current and 71% for current and/or lifetime Axis I diagnosis. Forty-two percent of the patients were diagnosed with one or more personality disorders.
Lifetime psychiatric comorbidity in GID patients is high, and this should be taken into account in the assessment and treatment planning of GID patients.

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