Article

An LRRK2 mutation as a cause for the parkinsonism in the original PARK8 family

Kitasato University, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
Annals of Neurology (Impact Factor: 11.91). 06/2005; 57(6):918-21. DOI: 10.1002/ana.20484
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We detected a missense mutation in the kinase domain of the LRRK2 gene in members with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease of the Japanese family (the Sagamihara family) who served as the basis for the original defining of the PARK8 Parkinson's disease locus. The results of the Sagamihara family, in combination with the unique pathological features characterized by pure nigral degeneration without Lewy bodies, provided us with valuable information for elucidating the protein structure-pathogenesis relationship for the gene product of LRRK2. We did not detect this mutation or other known mutations of the LRRK2 gene in Japanese patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease.

0 Followers
 · 
96 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 contains functional GTPase and kinase domains. The most common G2019S mutation enhances the kinase activity of LRRK2 in vitro whereas G2019S LRRK2 expression in cultured neurons induces toxicity in a kinase-dependent manner. These observations suggest a potential role for kinase activity in LRRK2-associated PD. We have recently developed a novel rodent model of PD with progressive neurodegeneration induced by the adenoviral-mediated expression of G2019S LRRK2. In the present study, we further characterize this LRRK2 model and determine the contribution of kinase activity to LRRK2-mediated neurodegeneration. Recombinant human adenoviral vectors were employed to deliver human wild-type, G2019S or kinase-inactive G2019S/D1994N LRRK2 to the rat striatum. LRRK2-dependent pathology was assessed in the striatum, a region where LRRK2 protein is normally enriched in the mammalian brain. Human LRRK2 variants are robustly expressed throughout the rat striatum. Expression of G2019S LRRK2 selectively induces the accumulation of neuronal ubiquitin-positive inclusions accompanied by neurite degeneration and the altered distribution of axonal phosphorylated neurofilaments. Importantly, the introduction of a kinase-inactive mutation (G2019S/D1994N) completely ameliorates the pathological effects of G2019S LRRK2 in the striatum supporting a kinase activity-dependent mechanism for this PD-associated mutation. Collectively, our study further elucidates the pathological effects of the G2019S mutation in the mammalian brain and supports the development of kinase inhibitors as a potential therapeutic approach for treating LRRK2-associated PD. This adenoviral rodent model provides an important tool for elucidating the molecular basis of LRRK2-mediated neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Neurobiology of Disease 02/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.nbd.2015.02.019 · 5.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The burden that Parkinson's disease (PD) exacts on the population continues to increase year after year. Though refinement of symptomatic treatments continues at a reasonable pace, no accepted therapies are available to slow or prevent disease progression. The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was identified in PD genetic studies and offers new hope for novel therapeutic approaches. The evidence linking LRRK2 kinase activity to PD susceptibility is presented, as well as seminal discoveries relevant to the prosecution of LRRK2 kinase inhibition. Finally, suggestions are made for predictive preclinical modeling and successful first-in-human trials. © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
    Movement Disorders 02/2015; 30(2). DOI:10.1002/mds.26075 · 5.63 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). The clinical and neurochemical features of LRRK2-linked PD are similar to idiopathic disease although neuropathology is somewhat heterogeneous. Dominant mutations in LRRK2 precipitate neurodegeneration through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism which can be modeled in transgenic mice overexpressing human LRRK2 variants. A number of LRRK2 transgenic mouse models have been developed that display abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and alterations in tau metabolism yet without consistently inducing dopaminergic neurodegeneration. To directly explore the impact of mutant LRRK2 on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, we developed conditional transgenic mice that selectively express human R1441C LRRK2 in dopaminergic neurons from the endogenous murine ROSA26 promoter. The expression of R1441C LRRK2 does not induce the degeneration of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons or striatal dopamine deficits in mice up to 2years of age, and fails to precipitate abnormal protein inclusions containing alpha-synuclein, tau, ubiquitin or autophagy markers (LC3 and p62). Furthermore, mice expressing R1441C LRRK2 exhibit normal motor activity and olfactory function with increasing age. Intriguingly, the expression of R1441C LRRK2 induces age-dependent abnormalities of the nuclear envelope in nigral dopaminergic neurons including reduced nuclear circularity and increased invaginations of the nuclear envelope. In addition, R1441C LRRK2 mice display increased neurite complexity of cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Collectively, these novel R1441C LRRK2 conditional transgenic mice reveal altered dopaminergic neuronal morphology with advancing age, and provide a useful tool for exploring the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the R1441C LRRK2 mutation in PD.
    Neurobiology of Disease 08/2014; 71. DOI:10.1016/j.nbd.2014.08.027 · 5.20 Impact Factor