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    ABSTRACT: Lewy body dementia (DLB) is common but frequently misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's disease plus delirium or parkinsonism. DRUGS USED IN THIS DISORDER CAN CAUSE EXACERBATIONS: neuroleptic medication is relatively contraindicated because some patients show severe neuroleptic sensitivity, antiparkinsonian medication has the potential to exacerbate psychotic symptoms, and even cholinesterase inhibitors, while relatively safe, have provoked adverse responses in some DLB patients. There are few data available about the use of memantine in DLB. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with Alzheimer disease and parkinsonism. After memantine was started he developed severe fluctuations in awareness, visual hallucinations, agitation, and worsened parkinsonism. When he was evaluated thoroughly, the diagnosis was revised to Lewy body dementia, leading to changes in treatment that were associated with dramatic improvement in the patient's mental status. In our patient, motor and cognitive symptoms worsened with memantine treatment; these resolved after memantine was discontinued.
    Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD 01/2006; 8(3):289-91. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In search of new drugs for Alzheimer's disease, we departed from the classic concepts and investigated the ability of normal and Alzheimer's disease brain to convert cholesterol to steroids, otherwise known as neurosteroids. We identified 22R-hydroxycholesterol to be present in much lower levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of Alzheimer's disease than in tissue from age-matched controls. 22R-hydroxycholesterol was shown to protect against beta-amyloid (A beta(42))-induced neurotoxicity and block the formation of A beta oligomers. In search of a 22R-hydroxycholesterol stable analog, we identified the naturally occurring heterospirostenol, (22R,25R)-20 alpha-spirost-5-en-3beta-yl hexanoate (caprospinol). The mechanism of action underlying the neuroprotective properties of caprospinol involves, first, the ability of the compound to bind A beta(42) and, second, its interaction with components of the mitochondria respiratory chain. Samaritan Pharmaceuticals is developing caprospinol as a disease-modifying drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Samaritan Pharmaceuticals filed for an Investigational New Drug application with the FDA in 2006. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parts of the application were found satisfactory, and the FDA has requested that additional information is submitted in support of caprospinol's safety prior to initiating the Phase I clinical study.
    Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs 04/2009; 18(3):265-76. DOI:10.1517/13543780902762827 · 5.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: As the world's population ages, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is projected to double every 20 years. Understanding the pathogenesis of AD and developing effective treatments is a public health imperative. Memantine is a low- to moderate-affinity, non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist that is currently approved for the treatment of moderate to severe AD. AREAS COVERED: We discuss the current evidence, emphasizing more recent studies examining the effects of memantine in AD. We also look at the gaps in the current knowledge; the studies that will be required to fill these gaps are also discussed. The present paper reviews: the pharmacology of memantine; evidence for its use in moderate to severe AD, as well as in mild to moderate AD; adverse events related to memantine use; its effects specifically on behaviours including aggression and agitation; the pharmacoeconomics of memantine; and the use of memantine in other dementias. Memantine has shown modest benefits in cognition, function, global and behavioural measures, and has shown little potential for drug-drug interactions. EXPERT OPINION: For the treatment of moderate to severe AD, memantine should be offered as a therapeutic option, either on its own, or in combination with a cholinesterase inhibitor.
    Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 04/2011; 12(5):787-800. DOI:10.1517/14656566.2011.558006 · 3.09 Impact Factor