Article

A screen of the complete protein kinase gene family identifies diverse patterns of somatic mutations in human breast cancer.

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK.
Nature Genetics (Impact Factor: 29.65). 07/2005; 37(6):590-2. DOI: 10.1038/ng1571
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We examined the coding sequence of 518 protein kinases, approximately 1.3 Mb of DNA per sample, in 25 breast cancers. In many tumors, we detected no somatic mutations. But a few had numerous somatic mutations with distinctive patterns indicative of either a mutator phenotype or a past exposure.

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