Article

Identification and validation of QTL for Sclerotinia midstalk rot resistance in sunflower by selective genotyping

State Plant Breeding Institute (720), University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany.
Theoretical and Applied Genetics (Impact Factor: 3.66). 08/2005; 111(2):233-42. DOI: 10.1007/s00122-005-2004-x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Midstalk rot, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is an important cause of yield loss in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate the number, genomic positions and genetic effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to midstalk rot in line TUB-5-3234, derived from an interspecific cross; (2) determine congruency of QTL between this line and other sources of resistance; and (3) make inferences about the efficiency of selective genotyping (SG) in detecting QTL conferring midstalk rot resistance in sunflower. Phenotypic data for three resistance (stem lesion, leaf lesion and speed of fungal growth) and two morphological (leaf length and leaf length with petiole) traits were obtained from 434 F3 families from cross CM625 (susceptible) x TUB-5-3234 (resistant) under artificial infection in field experiments across two environments. The SG was applied by choosing the 60 most resistant and the 60 most susceptible F3 families for stem lesion. For genotyping of the respective F2 plants, 78 simple sequence repeat markers were used. Genotypic variances were highly significant for all traits. Heritabilities and genotypic correlations between reMidstalk rot, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is an important cause of yield loss in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate the number, genomic positions and genetic effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to midstalk rot in line TUB-5-3234, derived from an interspecific cross; (2) determine congruency of QTL between this line and other sources of resistance; and (3) make inferences about the efficiency of selective genotyping (SG) in detecting QTL conferring midstalk rot resistance in sunflower. Phenotypic data for three resistance (stem lesion, leaf lesion and speed of fungal growth) and two morphological (leaf length and leaf length with petiole) traits were obtained from 434 F3 families from cross CM625 (susceptible) x TUB-5-3234 (resistant) under artificial infection in field experiments across two environments. The SG was applied by choosing the 60 most resistant and the 60 most susceptible F3 families for stem lesion. For genotyping of the respective F2 plants, 78 simple sequence repeat markers were used. Genotypic variances were highly significant for all traits. Heritabilities and genotypic correlations between resistance traits were moderate to high. Three to four putative QTL were detected for each resistance trait explaining between 40.8% and 72.7% of the genotypic variance (PTS). Two QTL for stem lesion showed large genetic effects and corroborated earlier findings from the cross NDBLOSsel (resistant) x CM625 (susceptible). Our results suggest that SG can be efficiently used for QTL detection and the analysis of congruency for resistance genes across populations.

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