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    Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden) 10/2007; 47(3):476-8. DOI:10.1080/02841860701592418 · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It was reported that multiple myeloma (MM)-patients suffer from a higher incidence of osteomyelitis and necrosis of the jaws than patients treated with bisphosphonates for other reasons. The aim of this study is to report about 57 cases of bisphosphonate-related osteomyelitis and necrosis of the jaws (BON) and to investigate the differences between BON in MM and non-MM patients. Clinical and laboratory data of 57 cases were assessed. The features of BON and clinical-outcome were compared between the two groups. Treatment approach was assessed as a contributing-factor to treatment-outcome. Clinical presentation included exposed bone, pain, swelling and suppuration with little variation between the two groups. Past dento-alveolar surgery was common in both study-groups. Treatment outcome was poor (33% and 25% responded to treatment in MM group and non-MM group, respectively). Treatment modality did not affect the treatment outcome. The clinical presentation described in this case series should alert the physician to the possibility of BON. Although the literature shows a higher incidence of BON in MM patients compared to non-MM patients, our study suggests that the severity of the clinical presentation and the response to treatment are not worse in MM patients compared with non-MM patients. The predisposition of MM patients to BON should be further investigated.
    Clinical & Laboratory Haematology 01/2007; 28(6):393-8. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2257.2006.00841.x · 1.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable clonal B-cell malignancy with terminally differentiated plasma cells. It afflicts approximately 55,000 people in the United States. Over the past 5 years, significant progress has been made in the diagnosis and assessment of patients with MM. Significant advances include a simplified staging system, which has replaced the more cumbersome Durie-Salmon staging system; an updated uniform international response criteria; the development of a sensitive new serum test to detect free light chain production (free light chain assay); the recognition of specific adverse cytogenetic abnormalities; and the evolution of genomics, which will identify specific and targeted therapies for individual MM patients. For the first time in decades, major therapeutic advances have been implemented in the treatment of MM patients. These include 2 new classes of agent: immunomodulatory drugs and proteosome inhibitors. In addition, clinical trials have solidified the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplant and established the benefits of post-transplant maintenance therapy. Finally, a number of new agents are in development that specifically target the myeloma cells and/or the bone marrow microenvironment. These advances have resulted in expanded treatment options, prolonged disease control and survival, and improved quality of life for patients with MM.
    CA A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 09/2007; 57(5):301-18. DOI:10.3322/CA.57.5.301 · 162.50 Impact Factor