Article

Antinociceptive activity of alcoholic extract of Hemidesmus indicus R.Br. in mice

J.L. Chaturvedi College of Pharmacy, Ajni, Maharashtra, India
Journal of Ethnopharmacology (Impact Factor: 2.94). 12/2005; 102(2):298-301. DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2005.05.039
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The ethanolic extract of roots of Hemidesmus indicus R.Br. (family: Asclepiadaceae) was investigated for possible antinociceptive effect in mice. Three models were used to study the effects of extracts on nociception, which was induced, by acetic acid (Writhing test), formalin (Paw licking test) and hot plate test in mice. Hemidesmus indicus R.Br. extract was administered in the dose range of 25, 50 and 100mg/kg orally 1h prior to pain induction. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the extract showed the presence of triterpenes, flavonoids, pregnane glycosides and steroids. Oral administration of Hemidesmus indicus extract revealed dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all the models for antinociception and it blocked both the neurogenic and inflammatory pain and the nociceptive activity was comparable with the reference drug. The results indicate that alcoholic extract of Hemidesmus indicus R.Br. possesses a significant antinociceptive activity. The activity can be related with the significant phytochemicals such as triterpenes, flavonoids, and sterols reported in the root extract.

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