Article

Tight junctions, leaky intestines, and pediatric diseases.

International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Shanghai, China.
Acta Paediatrica (Impact Factor: 1.84). 05/2005; 94(4):386-93. DOI: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2005.tb01904.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Tight junctions (TJs) represent the major barrier within the paracellular pathway between intestinal epithelial cells. Disruption of TJs leads to intestinal hyperpermeability (the so-called "leaky gut") and is implicated in the pathogenesis of several acute and chronic pediatric disease entities that are likely to have their origin during infancy.
This review provides an overview of evidence for the role of TJ breakdown in diseases such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, allergies, asthma, and autism.
A better basic understanding of this structure might lead to prevention or treatment of these diseases using nutritional or other means.

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