Article

Cerebrospinal fluid adenosine deaminase levels and adverse neurological outcome in pediatric tuberculous meningitis

Government of India, New Dilli, NCT, India
Infection (Impact Factor: 2.86). 09/2005; 33(4):264-6. DOI: 10.1007/s15010-005-5005-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT There is a lack of data on the prognostic significance of changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) parameters in tuberculous meningitis. Our objective was to determine whether changes in CSF parameters are associated with poor neurological outcome in tuberculous meningitis.
We conducted a prospective cohort study on children admitted with a diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis to Government General Hospital in Kakinada, India. On admission, CSF parameters including cell count with fraction of lymphocytes and neutrophil leukocytes, glucose, protein, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels were measured. We compared levels in children with and without adverse neurological outcome.
A total of 26 children was enrolled over a 2-year period. Ten had an adverse neurological outcome. Six had permanent neurological deficits (four hemiplegia and two cranial nerve palsies), two a hydrocephalus and two died. There was no significant (p>0.05) difference in age, gender and in CSF parameters, including cell count, lymphocyte and neutrophil leukocyte fraction, glucose, protein, and LDH levels between patients with and without adverse neurological outcome. Patients with adverse outcome had with a mean (SD) of 17.1 (3.2) IU/l a significantly higher ADA level than patients without, who had a mean (SD) level of 11.3 (2.7) IU/l (p<0.001, t-test).
Adverse neurological outcome in childhood tuberculous meningitis is associated with increased cerebrospinal fluid adenosine deaminase levels.

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