Article

ROCR: visualizing classifier performance in R.

Department of Computational Biology and Applied Algorithmics, Max-Planck-Institute for Informatics, Saarbrücken, Germany.
Bioinformatics (Impact Factor: 4.62). 11/2005; 21(20):3940-1. DOI: 10.1093/bioinformatics/bti623
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT ROCR is a package for evaluating and visualizing the performance of scoring classifiers in the statistical language R. It features over 25 performance measures that can be freely combined to create two-dimensional performance curves. Standard methods for investigating trade-offs between specific performance measures are available within a uniform framework, including receiver operating characteristic (ROC) graphs, precision/recall plots, lift charts and cost curves. ROCR integrates tightly with R's powerful graphics capabilities, thus allowing for highly adjustable plots. Being equipped with only three commands and reasonable default values for optional parameters, ROCR combines flexibility with ease of usage. AVAILABILITY: http://rocr.bioinf.mpi-sb.mpg.de. ROCR can be used under the terms of the GNU General Public License. Running within R, it is platform-independent. CONTACT: tobias.sing@mpi-sb.mpg.de.

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