Article

PharmGKB: the pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics knowledge base.

Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
Methods in Molecular Biology (Impact Factor: 1.29). 02/2005; 311:179-91. DOI: 10.1385/1-59259-957-5:179
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (PharmGKB) is an interactive tool for researchers investigating how genetic variation effects drug response. The PharmGKB web site, www.pharmgkb.org, displays genotype, molecular, and clinical primary data integrated with literature, pathway representations, protocol information, and links to additional external resources. Users can search and browse the knowledge base by genes, drugs, diseases, and pathways. Registration is free to the entire research community but subject to an agreement to respect the rights and privacy of the individuals whose information is contained within the database. Registered users can access and download primary data to aid in the design of future pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics studies.

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