Article

Telomerase antagonists GRN163 and GRN163L inhibit tumor growth and increase chemosensitivity of human hepatoma

Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endocrinology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
Hepatology (Impact Factor: 11.19). 11/2005; 42(5):1127-36. DOI: 10.1002/hep.20822
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Most cancer cells have an immortal growth capacity as a consequence of telomerase reactivation. Inhibition of this enzyme leads to increased telomere dysfunction, which limits the proliferative capacity of tumor cells; thus, telomerase inhibition represents a potentially safe and universal target for cancer treatment. We evaluated the potential of two thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide inhibitors of telomerase, GRN163 and GRN163L, as drug candidates for the treatment of human hepatoma. GRN163 and GRN163L were tested in preclinical studies using systemic administration to treat flank xenografts of different human hepatoma cell lines (Hep3B and Huh7) in nude mice. The studies showed that both GRN163 and GRN163L inhibited telomerase activity and tumor cell growth in a dose-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. The potency and efficacy of the lipid-conjugated antagonist, GRN163L, was superior to the nonlipidated parent compound, GRN163. Impaired tumor growth in vivo was associated with critical telomere shortening, induction of telomere dysfunction, reduced rate of cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis in the treatment groups. In vitro, GRN163L administration led to higher prevalence of chromosomal telomere-free ends and DNA damage foci in both hepatoma cell lines. In addition, in vitro chemosensitivity assay showed that pretreatment with GRN163L increased doxorubicin sensitivity of Hep3B. In conclusion, our data support the development of GRN163L, a novel lipidated conjugate of the telomerase inhibitor GRN163, for systemic treatment of human hepatoma. In addition to limiting the proliferative capacity of hepatoma, GRN163L might also increase the sensitivity of this tumor type to conventional chemotherapy.

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