Article

The role of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in growth and development.

Dept of Neurology-Developmental Neurology, University Hospital Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands.
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Impact Factor: 2.01). 02/2005; 569:80-94. DOI: 10.1007/1-4020-3535-7_13
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT It is debatable whether supplementation of infant formula with LCPUFA has an effect on infant growth and development. Up till now, there is little evidence of a negative effect on infant growth. A review of randomized controlled trials in term infants revealed that LCPUFA, in particularly supplementation with > or = 0.30% DHA, seems to have a beneficial effect on neurodevelopmental outcome up to 4 months of age. The studies could not demonstrate a consistent positive effect beyond that age. However, in the majority of studies neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed between 6 to 24 months, i.e. at an age where there is a 'latency' in the expression of minor neurological dysfunction. Thus it is possible that LCPUFA might have a long lasting beneficial effect on neurodevelopmental outcome at school-age and beyond. This hypothesis urgently needs testing.

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