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Progressive intestinal, neurological and psychiatric problems in two adult males with cerebral creatine deficiency caused by an SLC6A8 mutation.

Clinical Genetics (Impact Factor: 3.65). 11/2005; 68(4):379-81. DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2005.00489.x
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