Article

Hippocampal magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in transient global amnesia

Sacred Heart University, Феърфилд, Connecticut, United States
JAMA Neurology (Impact Factor: 7.01). 10/2005; 62(9):1468-9. DOI: 10.1001/archneur.62.9.1468
Source: PubMed
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