Article

An evolutionary proteomics approach identifies substrates of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

Department of Molecular Genetics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 10/2005; 102(39):13933-8. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0501046102
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Protein kinases are important mediators of much of the signal transduction that occurs in eukaryotic cells. Unfortunately, the identification of protein kinase substrates has proven to be a difficult task, and we generally know few, if any, of the physiologically relevant targets of any particular kinase. Here, we describe a sequence-based approach that simplified this substrate identification process for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this method, the evolutionary conservation of all PKA consensus sites in the S. cerevisiae proteome was systematically assessed within a group of related yeasts. The basic premise was that a higher degree of conservation would identify those sites that are functional in vivo. This method identified 44 candidate PKA substrates, 5 of which had been described. A phosphorylation analysis showed that all of the identified candidates were phosphorylated by PKA and that the likelihood of phosphorylation was strongly correlated with the degree of target site conservation. Finally, as proof of principle, the activity of one particular target, Atg1, a key regulator of autophagy, was shown to be controlled by PKA phosphorylation in vivo. These data therefore suggest that this evolutionary proteomics approach identified a number of PKA substrates that had not been uncovered by other methods. Moreover, these data show how this approach could be generally used to identify the physiologically relevant occurrences of any protein motif identified in a eukaryotic proteome.

0 Followers
 · 
98 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is an evolutionarily conserved sensor of nutrient availability. Genetic and pharmacological studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided mechanistic insights on the regulation of TORC1 signaling in response to nutrients. Using a highly specific antibody that recognizes phosphorylation of the bona fide TORC1 target ribosomal protein S6 (Rps6) in yeast, we found that nutrients rapidly induce Rps6 phosphorylation in a TORC1-dependent manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that Ypk3, an AGC kinase which exhibits high homology to human S6 kinase (S6K), is required for the phosphorylation of Rps6 in vivo. Rps6 phosphorylation is completely abolished in cells lacking Ypk3 (ypk3Δ), whereas Sch9, previously reported to be the yeast ortholog of S6K, is dispensable for Rps6 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation-deficient mutations in regulatory motifs of Ypk3 abrogate Rps6 phosphorylation, and complementation of ypk3Δ cells with human S6 kinase restores Rps6 phosphorylation in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Our findings demonstrate that Ypk3 is a critical component of the TORC1 pathway and that the use of a phospho-S6 specific antibody offers a valuable tool to identify new nutrient-dependent and rapamycin-sensitive targets in vivo.
    PLoS ONE 03/2015; 10(3):e0120250. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0120250 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Dataset: 3475-3
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Autophagy is a catabolic recycling pathway triggered by various intra- or extracellular stimuli that is conserved from yeast to mammals. During autophagy, diverse cytosolic constituents are enveloped by double-membrane vesicles, autophagosomes, which later fuse with lysosomes or the vacuole to degrade their cargo. Dysregulation in autophagy is associated with a diverse range of pathologies including cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the world. As such, there is great interest in identifying novel mechanisms that govern the cardiovascular response to disease-related stress. First described in failing hearts, autophagy within the cardiovascular system has been characterized widely in cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. In all cases, a window of optimal autophagic activity seems to be critical to the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis and function; excessive or insufficient levels of autophagic flux can each contribute to heart disease pathogenesis. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that govern autophagosome formation and analyze the link between autophagy and cardiovascular disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Circulation Research 01/2015; 116(3):456-467. DOI:10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.114.303788 · 11.09 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
31 Downloads
Available from
May 19, 2014

Similar Publications