Article

Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in spinal cord-injured mice

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reeve-Irvine Research Center, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 10/2005; 102(39):14069-74. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0507063102
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We report that prospectively isolated, human CNS stem cells grown as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns) survive, migrate, and express differentiation markers for neurons and oligodendrocytes after long-term engraftment in spinal cord-injured NOD-scid mice. hCNS-SCns engraftment was associated with locomotor recovery, an observation that was abolished by selective ablation of engrafted cells by diphtheria toxin. Remyelination by hCNS-SCns was found in both the spinal cord injury NOD-scid model and myelin-deficient shiverer mice. Moreover, electron microscopic evidence consistent with synapse formation between hCNS-SCns and mouse host neurons was observed. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytic differentiation was rare, and hCNS-SCns did not appear to contribute to the scar. These data suggest that hCNS-SCns may possess therapeutic potential for CNS injury and disease.

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Available from: Brian J Cummings, Jul 06, 2015
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