Article

Two-sided confidence intervals for the single proportion: comparison of seven methods by Robert G. Newcombe,Statistics in Medicine 1998;17:857–872

Statistics in Medicine (Impact Factor: 2.04). 11/2005; 24(21):3383-4. DOI: 10.1002/sim.2164
Source: PubMed
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