Article

Diagnosis and management of thyroid orbitopathy.

Oculofacial and Facial Cosmetic Surgery, Davis Duehr Dean, and Oculoplastics Service, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America (Impact Factor: 1.34). 11/2005; 38(5):1043-74. DOI: 10.1016/j.otc.2005.03.015
Source: PubMed
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