Article

Genotype-phenotype analysis of human frontoparietal polymicrogyria syndromes

Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Annals of Neurology (Impact Factor: 11.91). 11/2005; 58(5):680-7. DOI: 10.1002/ana.20616
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Human cerebral cortical polymicrogyria is a heterogeneous disorder, with only one known gene (GPR56) associated with an apparently distinctive phenotype, termed bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP). To define the range of abnormalities that could be caused by human GPR56 mutations and to establish diagnostic criteria for BFPP, we analyzed the GPR56 gene in a cohort of 29 patients with typical BFPP. We identified homozygous GPR56 mutations in all 29 patients with typical BFPP. The total of 11 GPR56 mutations found represented a variety of distinct founder mutations in various populations throughout the world. In addition, we analyzed five patients with BFPP who did not show GPR56 mutation and found that they define a clinically, radiographically, and genetically distinct syndrome that we termed BFPP2. Finally, we studied seven patients with a variety of other polymicrogyria syndromes including bilateral frontal polymicrogyria, bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria, and bilateral generalized polymicrogyria. No GPR56 mutation was found in these patients. This study provides a molecular confirmation of the BFPP phenotype and provides the wherewithal for diagnostic screening.

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