Article

RAS pathway activation and an oncogenic RAS mutation in sporadic pilocytic astrocytoma.

Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
Neurology (Impact Factor: 8.3). 11/2005; 65(8):1335-6. DOI: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000180409.78098.d7
Source: PubMed
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