Article

Application of satellite infrared data for mapping of thermal plume contamination in coastal ecosystem of Korea.

Ocean Satellite Research Group, Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan, P.O. Box 29, Seoul 425-600, Korea.
Marine Environmental Research (Impact Factor: 2.34). 04/2006; 61(2):186-201. DOI: 10.1016/j.marenvres.2005.09.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The 5900 MW Younggwang nuclear power station on the west coast of Korea discharges warm water affecting coastal ecology [KORDI report (2003). Wide area observation of the impact of the operation of Younggwang nuclear power plant 5 and 6, No. BSPI 319-00-1426-3, KORDI, Seoul, Korea]. Here the spatial and temporal characteristics of the thermal plume signature of warm water are reported from a time series (1985-2003) of space-borne, thermal infrared data from Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Sea surface temperature (SST) were characterized using advanced very high resolution radiometer data from the NOAA satellites. These data demonstrated the general pattern and extension of the thermal plume signature in the Younggwang coastal areas. In contrast, the analysis of SST from thematic mapper data using the Landsat-5 and 7 satellites provided enhanced information about the plume shape, dimension and direction of dispersion in these waters. The thermal plume signature was detected from 70 to 100 km to the south of the discharge during the summer monsoon and 50 to 70 km to the northwest during the winter monsoon. The mean detected plume temperature was 28 degrees C in summer and 12 degrees C in winter. The DeltaT varied from 2 to 4 degrees C in winter and 2 degrees C in summer. These values are lower than the re-circulating water temperature (6-9 degrees C). In addition the temperature difference between tidal flats and offshore (SSTtidal flats - SSToffsore) was found to vary from 5.4 to 8.5 degrees C during the flood tides and 3.5 degrees C during the ebb tide. The data also suggest that water heated by direct solar radiation on the tidal flats during the flood tides might have been transported offshore during the ebb tide. Based on these results we suggest that there is an urgent need to protect the health of Younggwang coastal marine ecosystem from the severe thermal impact by the large quantity of warm water discharged from the Younggwang nuclear power plant.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
75 Views
  • Source
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Coastal temperature is an important indicator of water quality, particularly in regions where delicate ecosystems sensitive to water temperature are present. Remote sensing methods are highly reliable for assessing the thermal dispersion. The plume dispersion from the thermal outfall of the nuclear power plant at Kalpakkam, on the southeast coast of India, was investigated from March to December 2011 using thermal infrared images along with field measurements. The absolute temperature as provided by the thermal infrared (TIR) images is used in the Arc GIS environment for generating a spatial pattern of the plume movement. Good correlation of the temperature measured by the TIR camera with the field data (r(2) = 0.89) make it a reliable method for the thermal monitoring of the power plant effluents. The study portrays that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means of monitoring the thermal distribution pattern in coastal waters.
    Environmental science. Processes & impacts. 07/2013;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This work contributes to the study of nuclear plant thermal discharges in coastal areas by using a numerical model which solves the Navier-Stokes-Reynolds equations for shallow waters and the energy equation for computing temperature variations. The numerical model takes into account the heat flux given in the upper layer, where the free surface and the atmosphere interact. In this study, the thermal plume dispersion from the nuclear power plant Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico, is analyzed. Bathymetry, oceanographic, meteorological, hydrologic and plant operating data are used to run numerical simulations. The results are compared against observed data showing good agreement. The Nash-Suffle's criterion is also applied to verify the quality of the numerical solution obtaining suitable results.
    Revista Internacional de Métodos Numéricos para Cálculo y Diseño en Ingeniería. 01/2013; 29(2):114–121.