Article

β 1 integrin function in vivo: Adhesion, migration and more

Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Junior Group Regulation of Cytoskeletal Organization, Martinsried, Germany.
Cancer and metastasis reviews (Impact Factor: 6.45). 10/2005; 24(3):403-11. DOI: 10.1007/s10555-005-5132-5
Source: PubMed
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