Article

Methods to assess potential reduced exposure products

University of Minnesota Cancer Center, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA.
Nicotine & Tobacco Research (Impact Factor: 2.81). 01/2006; 7(6):827-44. DOI: 10.1080/14622200500266015
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The availability of tobacco products purported to reduce toxin exposure or potentially reduce health risks necessitates the development of methods and identification of biomarkers that can be used to assess these products. These assessments occur on multiple levels and stages, from identifying constituents in the tobacco products and smoke, to human exposure and health effects trials, to postmarketing surveillance. A conference of multidisciplinary experts was convened to present and discuss methods and biomarkers to assess these products and to consider the infrastructure necessary to facilitate the evaluation process. Although no currently available set of measures was thought to be sufficient for determining the relative health risk of potential reduced exposure products, this paper provides a blueprint for future research toward this end.

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Available from: Deirdre (Dee) Lawrence Kittner, Jul 29, 2015
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    • "The study was designed to examine changes in selected tobacco-specific and tobacco-related biomarkers of exposure to HPHC known to be present in the gas–vapor phase (1,3-butadiene, acrolein, benzene, CO, and crotonaldehyde ) and the particulate phase (2-naphthylamine, 4-aminobi- phenyl, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone [NNK], acrylamide, nicotine, pyrene, and o-toluidine) of mainstream cigarette smoke. The use of suitable biomarkers of exposure to these HPHC offers one potential method to assess whether differences in exposure to cigarette smoke HPHC has occurred in smokers switching from one cigarette to another (Shields, 2002; Hecht, 2003; Hatsukami et al., 2005). Excretion of mutagenic material in urine was also measured. "
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    • "The study was designed to examine changes in selected tobacco-specific and related biomarkers of exposure to HPHC present in the gas–vapor phase (1,3-butadiene, acrolein, benzene, carbon monoxide (CO), crotonaldehyde, and menthol) and the particulate phase (2-naph- thylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl, 4-methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyri- dyl)-1-butanone (NNK), acrylamide, nicotine, pyrene, and o-toluidine) of mainstream cigarette smoke, as well as excretion of mutagenic material in urine. The use of suitable biomarkers of exposure to these compounds offers one potential method to assess whether differences in exposure to cigarette smoke HPHC has occurred in smokers switching from one cigarette to another (Shields, 2002; Hatsukami et al., 2005). In addition, serum Clara cell 16 kDA protein was determined as an investigational biomarker of lung epithelial injury (Robin et al., 2002). "
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