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Local anesthetics for the treatment of neuropathic pain: on the limits of meta-analysis.

Anesthesia & Analgesia (Impact Factor: 3.42). 01/2006; 101(6):1736-7. DOI: 10.1213/01.ANE.0000184194.99110.80
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