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Medical professionalism and the clinical anatomist

Institute of Medicine and Humanities, The University of Montana and St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Missoula, Montana 59802, USA.
Clinical Anatomy (Impact Factor: 1.16). 07/2006; 19(5):393-402. DOI: 10.1002/ca.20258
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Medical professionalism has become an important issue for medical education and practice. The core attributes of professionalism derive from the roles and responsibilities of professions and from the nature of medicine as a healing profession. In medical education, most of the focus on professionalism has been directed to the clinical arena, yet it is critically important that the attributes of professionalism be manifested in basic science courses--especially anatomy--as well as in clinical experiences, because the transformation from medical student to physician begins at the outset of medical school. Throughout history, anatomists have exemplified many of the attributes and values of professionalism, and clinical anatomists today still have much to offer. Anatomy faculty have an important responsibility to nurture and exemplify professionalism.

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    • "In line with much discussion in the literature about dissection being an important opportunity for teaching professionalism and teamwork skills ( Granger , 2004 ; Swartz , 2006 ; Swick , 2006 ; Albanese , 2010 ) , it was interesting to note very positive responses to the two statements about professional staff . The statements that the professional staff were ' ' . . . "
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    • "This is obvious in the fact that these abilities are often neglected within the medical curriculum and their mediation is left to the effects of the " hidden curriculum " . In the past, qualitative studies have shown that learning anatomy by experiencing the dissection of cadavers fosters the development of professionalism in being a doctor (Lempp, 2005; Swick, 2006; Netterstrom and Kayser, 2008). However, the dissection of cadavers in the gross anatomy course is an additional stress factor for students in addition to the very challenging learning load. "
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    • "This is obvious in the fact that these abilities are often neglected within the medical curriculum and their mediation is left to the effects of the " hidden curriculum " . In the past, qualitative studies have shown that learning anatomy by experiencing the dissection of cadavers fosters the development of professionalism in being a doctor (Lempp, 2005; Swick, 2006; Netterstrom and Kayser, 2008). However, the dissection of cadavers in the gross anatomy course is an additional stress factor for students in addition to the very challenging learning load. "
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