Article

Adolescent Development in Interpersonal and Societal Contexts

Department of Clinical & Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA.
Annual Review of Psychology (Impact Factor: 20.53). 02/2006; 57(1):255-84. DOI: 10.1146/annurev.psych.57.102904.190124
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this chapter we review theoretical and empirical advances in research on adolescent development in interpersonal and societal contexts. First, we identify several trends in current research, including the current emphasis on ecological models and the focus on diversity in and relational models of adolescent development. Next, we discuss recent research on interpersonal relationships, with an eye toward identifying major research themes and findings. Research on adolescents' relationships with parents, siblings, other relatives, peers, and romantic partners, and adolescents' involvement in community and society is reviewed. Future directions in research on adolescent development are discussed.

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