Article

[The multi-level Meta analysis model combining individual level data with aggregative level data].

Department of Health Statistics, West China School of Public Health, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China.
Sichuan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Sichuan University. Medical science edition 12/2005; 36(6):888-91.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To explore the multi-level Meta analysis model combining individual level data with aggregative level data and its application in medicine.
The difference in respect to "decreased hemoglobin A(1c)" between treatment with roglizatone and treatment without roglizatone was obtained by combining individual level data from clinical trial of roglizatone natrium with aggregative level data from literatures. This endeavor was regarded as an example to construct the multi-level Meta analysis model combining individual level data with aggregative level data.
The baseline hemoglobin A(1c) was 9% and the dose of drug was 4 mg per day. The average difference in "decreased hemoglobin A(1c)" between treatment with and without roglizatone was 0. 464%, with a 95% CI from 0.168% to 0.760%.
In case that individual data are available, the multi-level Meta analysis model combining individual level data with aggregative level data can utilize the data resources adequately and the results obtained should be more accurate.

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