Article

Direct regulation of myelin protein zero expression by the Egr2 transactivator.

Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology Program, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, 2015 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53705, USA.
Journal of Biological Chemistry (Impact Factor: 4.65). 04/2006; 281(9):5453-60. DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M512159200
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT During myelination of the peripheral nervous system, the myelin protein zero (Mpz) gene is induced to produce the most abundant protein component (P(0)) of mature myelin. Although the basal embryonic expression of Mpz in Schwann cells has been attributed to regulation by Sox10, the molecular mechanism for the profound up-regulation of this gene during myelination has not been established. In this study, we have identified a highly conserved element within the first intron of the Mpz gene, which contains binding sites for the early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factor, a critical regulator of peripheral nerve myelination. Egr2 can transactivate the intron element, and the induction is blocked by two known repressors of Egr2 activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we find that Egr2 binds in vivo to the intron element, but not to the Mpz promoter. Known inducers of Mpz expression such as forskolin and insulin-like growth factor-1 also activate the element in an Egr2-dependent manner. In addition, we found that Egr2 can act synergistically with Sox10 to activate this intron element, suggesting a model in which cooperative interactions between Egr2 and Sox10 mediate a large increase in Mpz expression to the high levels found in myelinating Schwann cells.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
62 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Low levels of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein lead to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The major pathological hallmark of SMA is a loss of lower motor neurons from spinal cord and peripheral nerve. However, recent studies have revealed pathological changes in other cells and tissues of the neuromuscular system. Here, we demonstrate intrinsic, SMN-dependent defects in Schwann cells in SMA. Myelination in intercostal nerves was perturbed at early- and late-symptomatic stages of disease in two mouse models of SMA. Similarly, maturation of axo-glial interactions at paranodes was disrupted in SMA mice. In contrast, myelination of motor axons in the corticospinal tract of the spinal cord occurred normally. Schwann cells isolated from SMA mice had significantly reduced levels of SMN and failed to express key myelin proteins following differentiation, likely due to perturbations in protein translation and/or stability rather than transcriptional defects. Myelin protein expression was restored in SMA Schwann cells following transfection with an SMN construct. Co-cultures of healthy neurons with diseased Schwann cells revealed deficient myelination, suggestive of intrinsic defects in Schwann cells, as well as reduced neurite stability. Alongside myelination defects, SMA Schwann cells failed to express normal levels of key extracellular matrix proteins, including laminin α2. We conclude that Schwann cells require high levels of SMN protein for their normal development and function in vivo, with reduced levels of SMN resulting in myelination defects, delayed maturation of axo-glial interactions and abnormal composition of extracellular matrix in peripheral nerve.
    Human Molecular Genetics 12/2013; · 7.69 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
    11/2013;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Oligodendrocytes and the myelin they produce are a remarkable vertebrate specialization that enables rapid and efficient nerve conduction within the central nervous system. The generation of myelin during development involves a finely-tuned pathway of oligodendrocyte precursor specification, proliferation and migration followed by differentiation and the subsequent myelination of appropriate axons. In this review we summarize the molecular mechanisms known to regulate each of these processes, including the extracellular ligands that promote or inhibit development of the oligodendrocyte lineage, the intracellular pathways they signal through and the key transcription factors that mediate their effects. Many of these regulatory mechanisms have recurring roles in regulating several transitions during oligodendrocyte development, highlighting their importance. It is also highly likely that many of these developmental mechanisms will also be involved in myelin repair in human neurological disease.
    Neuroscience 11/2013; · 3.12 Impact Factor