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Patterns of sequence loss and cytosine methylation within a population of newly resynthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids.

Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1.
Plant physiology (Impact Factor: 7.39). 02/2006; 140(1):336-48. DOI: 10.1104/pp.105.066308
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Allopolyploid formation requires the adaptation of two nuclear genomes within a single cytoplasm, which may involve programmed genetic and epigenetic changes during the initial generations following genome fusion. To study the dynamics of genome change, we synthesized 49 isogenic Brassica napus allopolyploids and surveyed them with 76 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes and 30 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs. Here, we report on the types and distribution of genetic and epigenetic changes within the S(1) genotypes. We found that insertion/deletion (indel) events were rare, but not random. Of the 57,710 (54,383 RFLP and 3,327 SSR) parental fragments expected among the amphidiploids, we observed 56,676 or 99.9%. Three loci derived from Brassica rapa had indels, and one indel occurred repeatedly across 29% (14/49) of the lines. Loss of one parental fragment was due to the 400-bp reduction of a guanine-adenine dinucleotide repeat-rich sequence. In contrast to the 4% (3/76) RFLP probes that detected indels, 48% (35/73) detected changes in the CpG methylation status between parental genomes and the S1 lines. Some loci were far more likely than others to undergo epigenetic change, but the number of methylation changes within each synthetic polyploid was remarkably similar to others. Clear de novo methylation occurred at a much higher frequency than de novo demethylation within allopolyploid sequences derived from B. rapa. Our results suggest that there is little genetic change in the S(0) generation of resynthesized B. napus polyploids. In contrast, DNA methylation was altered extensively in a pattern that indicates tight regulation of epigenetic changes.

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