Article

Genetic variation in DTNBP1 influences general cognitive ability

Department of Psychiatry Research, The Zucker Hillside Hospital, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Glen Oaks, NY 11004, USA.
Human Molecular Genetics (Impact Factor: 6.68). 06/2006; 15(10):1563-8. DOI: 10.1093/hmg/ddi481
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Human intelligence is a trait that is known to be significantly influenced by genetic factors, and recent linkage data provide positional evidence to suggest that a region on chromosome 6p, previously associated with schizophrenia, may be linked to variation in intelligence. The gene for dysbindin-1 (DTNBP1) is located at 6p and has also been implicated in schizophrenia, a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction. We report an association between DTNBP1 genotype and general cognitive ability (g) in two independent cohorts, including 213 patients with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder and 126 healthy volunteers. These data suggest that DTNBP1 genetic variation influences human intelligence.

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Available from: Raju Kucherlapati, Apr 21, 2015
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