Article

The evaluation of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on patient depression and self-esteem

School of Nursing, National Defense Medical Center, T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing (Impact Factor: 1.03). 03/2006; 20(1):3-11. DOI: 10.1016/j.apnu.2005.08.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We evaluated the impact of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on the depression and self-esteem of clinically depressed patients. This longitudinal study involved 26 experimental group patients who received 12 weeks of cognitive-behavioral group therapy and 25 comparison subjects. Two weeks before the study, immediately upon therapy completion, and 1 month later, all the participants underwent pretest, posttest, and follow-up, respectively. The experimental group patients experienced greater cognitive improvements (i.e., depression relief, self-esteem increase) as compared with the comparison group subjects. One month after therapy completion, the depressive symptoms and self-esteem of the experimental group patients remained slightly but significantly better than those of the comparison group subjects.

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