Article

Induction of LFA-1-dependent neutrophil rolling on ICAM-1 by engagement of E-selectin.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.
Microcirculation (Impact Factor: 2.26). 04/2006; 13(2):99-109. DOI: 10.1080/10739680500466376
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To study rolling of mouse neutrophils on E-selectin and ICAM-1 in an ex vivo flow chamber system.
The authors developed a small autoperfused flow chamber (20 x 200-microm cross section) that allows direct visualization of cells with and without fluorescent labeling and does not require recirculation of blood.
Neutrophils rolled on E-selectin alone, but were unable to interact with immobilized ICAM-1. When ICAM-1 was co-immobilized with E-selectin, the number of cells that rolled was doubled, but no significant firm adhesion was observed. This phenomenon was specific for E-selectin, and no enhancement of rolling was observed when P-selectin was immobilized with ICAM-1. The increased neutrophil rolling seen on E-selectin and ICAM-1 substrates required beta2 integrins. Treating mice with antibodies to the beta2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1 showed that LFA-1 was primarily responsible for mediating rolling on ICAM-1 in this model. Increased rolling on E-selectin and ICAM-1 was significantly reduced following administration of a specific p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor.
The data show that neutrophil rolling on E-selectin leads to partial activation of LFA-1, enabling LFA-1-dependent rolling on ICAM-1. This mechanism is likely to amplify and accelerate neutrophil recruitment in inflammation.

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