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Dietary Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in the Pre-Insulin Era (1914-1922)

Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA.
Perspectives in biology and medicine (Impact Factor: 0.54). 02/2006; 49(1):77-83. DOI: 10.1353/pbm.2006.0017
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Before the discovery of insulin, one of the most common dietary treatments of diabetes mellitus was a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. A review of Frederick M. Allen's case histories shows that a 70% fat, 8% carbohydrate diet could eliminate glycosuria among hospitalized patients. A reconsideration of the role of the high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet for the treatment of diabetes mellitus is in order.

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