Article

Effects of methylphenidate on cognitive function and gait in patients with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

Movement Disorders Unit, NPF Center of Excellence, Department of Neurology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
Clinical Neuropharmacology (Impact Factor: 1.84). 01/2006; 29(1):15-7. DOI: 10.1097/00002826-200601000-00005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Twenty-one patients with Parkinson's disease were studied before and 2 h after the administration of a single dose of 20 mg of methylphenidate. In response to methylphenidate, attention significantly improved, whereas memory and visual-spatial performance were unchanged. Gait speed, stride time variability, and Timed Up and Go times (demonstrated measures of fall risk) significantly improved. These findings suggest a new potential pharmacologic means of enhancing mobility and decreasing fall risk in Parkinson's disease.

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