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Serendipitous discovery and X-ray structure of a human phosphate binding apolipoprotein.

Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale JP EBEL, 38027 Grenoble, France.
Structure (Impact Factor: 5.99). 04/2006; 14(3):601-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.str.2005.12.012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We report the serendipitous discovery of a human plasma phosphate binding protein (HPBP). This 38 kDa protein is copurified with the enzyme paraoxonase. Its X-ray structure is similar to the prokaryotic phosphate solute binding proteins (SBPs) associated with ATP binding cassette transmembrane transporters, though phosphate-SBPs have never been characterized or predicted from nucleic acid databases in eukaryotes. However, HPBP belongs to the family of ubiquitous eukaryotic proteins named DING, meaning that phosphate-SBPs are also widespread in eukaryotes. The systematic absence of complete genes for eukaryotic phosphate-SBP from databases is intriguing, but the astonishing 90% sequence conservation between genes belonging to evolutionary distant species suggests that the corresponding proteins play an important function. HPBP is the only known transporter capable of binding phosphate ions in human plasma and may become a new predictor of or a potential therapeutic agent for phosphate-related diseases such as atherosclerosis.

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    ABSTRACT: We report the serendipitous discovery of a human plasma phosphate binding protein (HPBP). This 38 kDa protein is co-purified with paraoxonase (PON1). The association between HPON1 and HPBP is modulated by phosphate and calcium concentrations. The HPBP X-ray structure solved at 1.9 A resolution is similar to the prokaryotic phosphate solute-binding proteins (SBPs) associated with ATP binding cassette transmembrane transporters, though phosphate-SBPs have never been characterized or predicted from nucleic acid databases in eukaryotes. However, HPBP belongs to the family of ubiquitous eukaryotic proteins named DING, meaning that phosphate-SBPs are also widespread in eukaryotes. The absence of complete genes for eukaryotic phosphate-SBP from databases is intriguing, but the astonishing 90% sequence conservation of genes between evolutionary distant species suggests that the corresponding proteins play an important function. HPBP is the first identified transporter capable of binding phosphate ions in human plasma. Thus it is thought to become a new predictor and a potential therapeutic agent for phosphate-related diseases such as atherosclerosis.
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    ABSTRACT: DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated.
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