Article

Important new players in secondary wall synthesis.

Department of Plant Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.
Trends in Plant Science (Impact Factor: 11.81). 05/2006; 11(4):162-4. DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2006.02.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Secondary walls in wood are the most abundant biomass produced by plants. Understanding how plants make wood is not only of interest in basic plant biology but also has important implications for tree biotechnology. Three recent papers report exciting findings regarding a group of novel glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in secondary wall synthesis. Because little is known about genes involved in the synthesis of wood polysaccharides other than cellulose, the identification of these GTs is a breakthrough in the molecular dissection of wood formation.

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