Article

Second Symposium on the Definition and Management of Anaphylaxis: Summary report - Second National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network Symposium

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Annals of emergency medicine (Impact Factor: 4.33). 05/2006; 47(4):373-80. DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2006.01.018
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT There is no universal agreement on the definition of anaphylaxis or the criteria for diagnosis. In July 2005, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network convened a second meeting on anaphylaxis, which included representatives from 16 different organizations or government bodies, including representatives from North America, Europe, and Australia, to continue working toward a universally accepted definition of anaphylaxis, establish clinical criteria that would accurately identify cases of anaphylaxis with high precision, further review the evidence on the most appropriate management of anaphylaxis, and outline the research needs in this area.

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