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    ABSTRACT: The chiropractic profession in Norway has increased five-fold in the last two decades. As there is no academic graduate program in Norway, all chiropractors have been trained outside of Norway, in either Europe, America or Australia. This might have given Norwegian chiropractors heterogenic characteristics concerning practice routines and clinical settings. However, little is known about what characterizes this profession and how it compares to other chiropractic professions in Europe. The aim of this survey was to describe major characteristics of the chiropractic profession in Norway. Two surveys were distributed to all 530 registered chiropractors in Norway in 2011. One survey was for all chiropractors (Survey 1) and the other for clinic owners (Survey 2). Results have been reported as tables and as approximate percentages in the text for ease of reading. Response rates were 61% (Survey 1, N = 320) and 71% (Survey 2, N = 217). More than two-thirds of the chiropractors in Norway had been in practice for under a decade. Only one in four chiropractors worked in solo practice and the majority shared premises with at least one colleague, typically at least one physiotherapist and one additional health practitioner. Today, only one in five clinics possessed radiologic equipment and one in ten had access to diagnostic ultrasound equipment. The majority of the chiropractors reported to apply mainly similar treatment modalities. More than 90% reported to use manipulation techniques on most patients, with soft tissue techniques and exercise modalities being almost as common. More than 3/4 of the profession reported that their clinical practice was in accordance with available clinical guidelines and about one third were positive about participating in future clinical research. The Norwegian chiropractic profession is relatively young and members report being satisfied with their work conditions. There is a clear difference from the earlier practice pattern in that intra- and inter-professional collaboration is more common and it is considered desirable. The profession seems to follow the modern trends in evidence-based practice by using X-rays more sparingly than previously, adhering to guidelines and being positive about research.
    12/2014; 22(1):44. DOI:10.1186/s12998-014-0044-5
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the life-time prevalence (LTP) of chronic low back pain (LBP) in young Korean males. We also evaluated the relationship between lumbar spinal lesions and their health related quality-of-life (HRQOL). A cross-sectional, self-reported survey was conducted in Korean males (aged 19-year-old) who underwent physical examinations for the conscript. We examined 3331 examinees in November 2014. We included 2411 subjects, who accepted to participate this study without any comorbidities. We interviewed using simple binary questions for their LBP experience and chronicity. HRQOL was assessed by Short-Form Health-Survey-36 (SF-36) in chronic LBP and healthy control groups. Radiological assessment was performed in chronic LBP group to determine whether there were any pathological causes of their symptoms. The LTP of chronic LBP was 13.4%. Most (71.7%) of them didn't have any lumbar spinal lesions (i.e., non-specific chronic LBP). The SF-36 subscale and summary scores were significantly lower in subjects with chronic LBP. Between specific and non-specific chronic LBP group, all physical and mental subscale scores were significantly lower in specific chronic LBP group, except mental health (MH) subscale score. In MH subscale and mental component summary score, statistical significant differences didn't appear between two groups (p=0.154, 0.126). In Korean males 19 years of age, the LTP of chronic LBP was 13.4%, and more than two-thirds were non-specific chronic LBP. Chronic LBP had a significant impact on HRQOL. The presence of lumbar spinal pathoanatomical lesions affected mainly on the physical aspect of HRQOL. It influenced little on the mental health.
    Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society 12/2014; 56(6):482-7. DOI:10.3340/jkns.2014.56.6.482 · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major public heath problem world-wide, particularly in low-income countries. Increased number of immunocompromised patients and immigration from countries where tuberculosis is endemic has resulted in increased number of cases in high-income countries. Tuberculosis can affect any organ system, but is of particular interest to chiropractors when it affects the neuromusculoskeletal system. Patients with tuberculosis of the neuromusculoskeletal system can present with mechanical low back pain or with complex neurologic deficits. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of considering a diagnosis of tuberculosis in susceptible populations and the devastating consequences of the disease. The epidemiology, clinical features and management of tuberculosis will also be presented to facilitate early diagnosis, appropriate referral and multidisciplinary care of these patients.

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May 28, 2014