Article

Renal mucinous tubular and spindle carcinoma lacks the gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 and losses of chromosome Y that are prevalent in papillary renal cell carcinoma.

Department of Pathology, Indiana University Medical Center, University Hospital, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
Modern Pathology (Impact Factor: 6.36). 05/2006; 19(4):488-93. DOI: 10.1038/modpathol.3800565
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma of the kidney is an uncommon, distinctive neoplasm characterized by the proliferation of cuboidal and spindle cells arranged in tubular or sheet-like arrays, typically with a mucinous or myxoid background. The most important differential diagnostic consideration of mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma is papillary renal cell carcinoma, type 1, with sarcomatoid transformation. The aim of our study is to investigate the pattern of possible gains or losses of chromosomes 7, 17 and Y in 10 mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinomas with interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Four-micron sections were obtained from paraffin blocks representative of the tumors and including adjacent non-neoplastic renal parenchyma from 10 patients. The patients' ages ranged from 20 to 80 years (mean: 62 years); eight were female, while two were male. FISH analysis was performed with centromeric probes for chromosomes 7, 17 and Y. One hundred fifty to 200 nuclei from each case were scored for hybridization signals and non-neoplastic parenchyma served as control tissue. We found that renal mucinous tubular and spindle carcinoma lacks the gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 and losses of chromosome Y that are typical of papillary renal cell carcinoma. FISH analysis with centromeric probes for these chromosomes is potentially helpful in differentiating mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinomas from papillary renal cell carcinomas.

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