Article

Assessment of sleep hygiene using the Sleep Hygiene Index.

University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.
Journal of Behavioral Medicine (Impact Factor: 3.1). 07/2006; 29(3):223-7. DOI: 10.1007/s10865-006-9047-6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Sleep Hygiene Index was developed to assess the practice of sleep hygiene behaviors. The Sleep Hygiene Index was delivered to 632 subjects and a subset of the subjects participated in a readministration of the instrument. Test-retest reliability analyses suggested that sleep hygiene behaviors are relatively stable over time for a nonclinical population. Results confirmed that sleep hygiene is strongly related to sleep quality and modestly related to perceptions of daytime sleepiness. As predicted, support of the sleep hygiene construct was also provided by strong correlations with the associated features of a diagnosis of inadequate sleep hygiene. The Sleep Hygiene Index, a much shorter sleep hygiene instrument than previously published, demonstrated comparable psychometric properties with additional evidence of validity and a clear item selection rationale.

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