Article

The ICF comprehensively covers the spectrum of health problems encountered by health professionals in patients with musculoskeletal conditions

World Health Organization WHO, Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 4.44). 11/2006; 45(10):1247-54. DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/kel097
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to investigate, whether the International Classification of Functioning, Disablity and Health (ICF) comprehensively covers the spectrum of health problems encountered by medical doctors and physiotherapists in patients with musculoskeletal conditions.
A worldwide e-mail survey with questionnaires that requested lists of relevant areas in the ICF components-body functions, body structures, activities and participation, and environmental factors-in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, low back pain and osteoporosis was conducted. The suitability of linking the named concepts to the ICF as well as the precision of the linking was characterized by assigning the concepts to six groups.
All concepts that were named by the experts could be linked to the ICF, with the exception of personal factors. Between 32% (environmental factors) and 51% (activities and participation) of the named concepts were linked to an ICF category with an identical meaning and the same grade of precision. All other named concepts were linked to ICF categories with a lower level of precision, or encompassed more than one ICF category, or were linked to an ICF category with a related, but not identical meaning.
The ICF covers comprehensively the spectrum of problems encountered in patients with musculoskeletal conditions by clinical experts throughout the world. This strengthens the validity of the ICF in the view of the users and will encourage the use of ICF-based applications such as the ICF checklist and the now-developed ICF Core Sets.

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Available from: Michaela Kirschneck, May 29, 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Submitted in accordance with the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the University of Leeds, School of Medicine. The candidate confirms that the work submitted is her own work and that appropriate credit has been given where reference has been made to the work of others. This copy has been supplied on the understanding that it is copyright material and that no quotation from the thesis may be published without proper acknowledgement.