Article

Contemporary issues in the diagnosis of prostate cancer for the radiologist.

Department of Radiology, Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent, NP20 2UB, UK.
European Radiology (Impact Factor: 4.34). 08/2006; 16(7):1580-90. DOI: 10.1007/s00330-006-0221-6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Prostate cancer diagnostic techniques have improved considerably in recent years, but they must yet be optimised to ensure cancer detection at a potentially curable stage. Arrangements for prostate biopsy vary throughout Europe, and prostate biopsy may be undertaken by urologists or radiologists. This review discusses current issues relevant for radiologists involved in the detection of early prostate cancer. Prostate biopsy should be based on a systematic approach involving 8-12 cores obtained with peri-prostatic infiltration of local anaesthetic. Quality issues being considered by the United Kingdom Prostate Cancer Risk Management Programme are discussed.

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