Article

Mitochondrial DNA deletions are abundant and cause functional impairment in aged human substantia nigra neurons.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.
Nature Genetics (Impact Factor: 29.65). 06/2006; 38(5):518-20. DOI: 10.1038/ng1778
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Using a novel single-molecule PCR approach to quantify the total burden of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules with deletions, we show that a high proportion of individual pigmented neurons in the aged human substantia nigra contain very high levels of mtDNA deletions. Molecules with deletions are largely clonal within each neuron; that is, they originate from a single deleted mtDNA molecule that has expanded clonally. The fraction of mtDNA deletions is significantly higher in cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient neurons than in COX-positive neurons, suggesting that mtDNA deletions may be directly responsible for impaired cellular respiration.

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