Article

SERPINB1 upregulation is associated with in vivo complex formation with neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G in a baboon model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

Division of Newborn Medicine, Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology (Impact Factor: 3.52). 11/2006; 291(4):L619-27. DOI: 10.1152/ajplung.00507.2005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) continues to be a major cause of morbidity in premature infants. An imbalance between neutrophil elastase and its inhibitors has been implicated in BPD. Serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN)B1 is an inhibitor of neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (cat G). Recent studies suggest that SERPINB1 could provide protection in the airways by regulating excess protease activity associated with inflammatory lung disorders. In this study, we determined the distribution and ontogeny of SERPINB1 in the baboon lung and characterized the expression of SERPINB1 in baboon models of BPD. SERPINB1 expression was detected in the conducting airway and glandular epithelial cells in addition to neutrophils, macrophages, and mast cells. SERPINB1 mRNA and protein expression increased with advancing gestational age and in the new BPD model. In contrast, SERPINB1 expression levels were decreased in the old BPD model. Furthermore, SERPINB1 was detected as a high-molecular-mass (HMM) complex in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from the BPD group. Analysis of the HMM complex by coimmunoprecipitation showed that these complexes were formed between SERPINB1 and NE or cat G. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ion trap mass spectrometry verified the presence of SERPINB1 in HMM complexes. Finally, NE activity level was compared between new and old baboon models of BPD and was found to be significantly lower in new BPD. Thus SERPINB1 upregulation in new BPD may be protective by contributing to the regulation of neutrophil proteases NE and cat G.

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