Article

Clinical trials in patients with biochemically relapsed prostate cancer

UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California/San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.
BJU International (Impact Factor: 3.13). 06/2006; 97(5):905-10. DOI: 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2006.06124.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this section there is a wide diversity of mini-reviews, covering several areas of interest for readers. Authors from the USA write about clinical trials in patients with biochemically relapsed prostate cancer, again bridging the divide between medical oncologists and urologists who specialise in urological oncological surgery. The second paper is a joint one from Germany and the USA, bringing the reader up to date with advances in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Finally there are two papers from Australia describing the use of positron emission tomography in renal cancer and in prostate cancer.

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