Article

[Treatment of ureterocele in ureteral duplication: upper pole nephro-ureterectomy by retroperitoneoscopy in children: 24 cases].

Service de Chirurgie Infantile, Hôpital Lenval, 57, avenue de la Californie, 06200 Nice, France.
Progrès en Urologie (Impact Factor: 0.8). 10/2002; 12(4):654-7.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of this study is to present the results of 24 upper pole nephrectomies performed by retroperitoneoscopy in children between 1995 and 2000.
This series of 24 children consisted of 15 girls and 9 boys with a mean age of 22 months. The patient was placed in the lateral supine position and 3 to 4 trocars were inserted. Parenchymal section was performed by ultrasound or unipolar scalpel.
Three cases (12.5%) required open conversion. Nine intraoperative complications (37%) were observed and repaired intraoperatively. Five postoperative complications (20%) consisted of residual perirenal collections, requiring drainage under anaesthesia in only one case. The mean operating time was 2 hours 40 minutes. The mean hospital stay was 3.4 days. The mean follow-up was 32 months. No cases of secondary atrophy of the lower pole were observed.
Overall, these preliminary results are comparable to those of conventional open surgery. The advantage of this method is a reduction of skin and musculo-aponeurotic scars.

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